Site News & Updates


Withdrawal of SSV for Mercury
Tuesday, 27 November 2018 12:42

Users of ATRISKSOIL may have recently seen an announcement that the Soil Guideline Value (SGV) and associated documentation for Mercury has been withdrawn.

 

The withdrawal of this documentation was decided by PHE and DEFRA following their review of the 'Scientific Opinion on the risk for public health related to the presence of mercury and methylmercury in food' published by European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) in 2012.

The EFSA report can be  accessed at the following location:

https://efsa.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.2903/j.efsa.2012.2985

 

The toxicological studies reviewed by EFSA indicate that a lower Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) would apply than was calculated in derivation of the former SGVs and therefore the current toxicological determination as set out in the former TOX report may not be adequately health protective.

Atkins are currently reviewing the EFSA determination, in light of the provenance now given to this research over former UK reviews.

Pending completion of this review the associated Atkins SSVs for the following substances should not be used:

  • Elemental Mercury;
  • Inorganic Mercury; and
  • Methyl Mercury.

 

We anticipate releasing an update to this value as soon as possible and when available this will be communicated to our subscribers via the news section of the website and a short email bulletin.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 27 November 2018 13:17
 
Major SSV Update – June 2017
Thursday, 22 June 2017 09:15

We are pleased to announce that we have completed our comprehensive update to the ATRISKsoil SSVs.

This comprises one of the largest updates since their inception back in 2006 and our SSV database now stretches to 100 compounds presented in a new easily readable format.

 

We have used the latest CLEA v1.071 software to derive updated SSVs based on Category 4 Screening Level (C4SL)

exposure assumptions at 1% Soil Organic Matter (SOM) for a sand soil and 6% SOM for a sandy loam soil type for the following C4SL standard land uses:

 

  • residential with consumption of home grown produce;
  • residential without consumption of home grown produce;
  • commercial;
  • public open space (residential);
  • public open space (parks); and,
  • allotments (6% SOM sandy loam only).

 

What makes the SSVs unique is that for residential and allotments land uses we have calculated the predicted exposure from each home grown produce type. The top two produce groups that result in the highest predicted exposure are set at the 90th percentile consumption rates and the remaining produce groups are set at the mean consumption rate. This method, as detailed in the C4SL Project Methodology documentation, has been adopted to ensure that the SSVs are not overly conservative but remain sufficiently precautionary.

 

We have also reviewed and updated the toxicological parameters and data sheets for the following ten contaminants:

 

  • Beryllium;
  • Chromium III;
  • Chromium VI;
  • Nickel;
  • 1,2-Dichloroethane;
  • Trichloroethene;
  • 1,1,1-Trichloroethane;
  • Carbon Tetrachloride;
  • 1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane; and,
  • 1,1,1,2-Tetrachloroethane.

 

You will find further information on the use of SSVs and their derivation in our accompanying guidance documentation.


Access to the SSVs remains free for local authorities and government agencies (.gov accounts only) and for commercial subscribers we have frozen the subscription price.

 

Please click here to subscribe to the ATRISKsoil Service.

 

If you have any queries, please Contact Us. A new and updated FAQ will be provided for the most popular questions we receive.

Please also get in touch for information on our training or risk assessment services.

What makes the SSVs unique is that we have also calculated the home grown produce types that result in the highest predicted exposure to contamination. Produce groups that result in the highest predicted exposure are set at the 90th percentile consumption rates and the remainder are set at the mean consumption rate. This method has been adopted, as set out in the C4SL Project Methodology, to ensure that the SSVs are not overly conservative but remain sufficiently precautionary.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 27 June 2017 14:15